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Gay Marriage: Governor Christ Christie Veto Challenged by New Jersey Democrats

Gay Marriage: Governor Christ Christie Veto Challenged by New Jersey Democrats

 

Democratic leaders in the New Jersey Legislature agreed to attempt to override Republican Governor Chris Chrstie’s gay marriage veto. If the unanimous veto fails, the state’s Democrats are open—for the first time—to place question in front of voters in November.

Assemblyman Reed Gusciora of Trenton, one of two gay state lawmakers, said Democratic leaders in the Assembly and Senate agreed to renew their efforts for legalizing gay marriage during a meeting on Thursday. The strategy is expected to include putting the question to the state’s voters in November with Christie on the ballot. Governor Christie, who is Catholic, opposes same-sex marriage.

The November ballot already is set to include a question on whether New Jersey should raise its minimum wage and Senator Barbara Buono, who supports both the minimum wage increase and gay marriage, at the top of ballot opposing Christie.

“This looks like a perfect storm to spark the Democratic base,” Gusciora opined.

Governor Christie, who vetoed the gay marriage bill last year, has urged lawmakers to pose the question to the public. “I am comfortable with the people of New Jersey making the decision,” Christie said Tuesday in Lavallette. “If they would like to put it on the ballot, then put it on the ballot.”

Senate President Stephen Sweeney, a loyal Democrat who was previously opposed to gay marriage but has since come to regret his stance and now supports it, previously refused to place the question in front of voters. Sweeney held same-sex marriage as a civil rights issue and one that does not belong on the ballot; however, with the help of Assembly Democratic Leader Lou Greenwald, the Senate President recognized the difficulty of overriding the Governor and agreed to keep their options open.

This maneuver displeases Troy Stevenson, who recently took over as President of Garden State Equality, the state’s most prominent gay-rights organization. Stevenson, who previously worked in Maine in 2009 on the losing end of a gay marriage referendum, believes the effort to secure gay marriage equality via a ballot initiative is expensive, divisive and particularly rough on families headed by same-sex couples.

The Democratic Legislature has never found success in overriding a Christie veto. To do so, they would need two-thirds majority in both the Assembly and Senate, which would require some Republicans to go against their governor.

Common Law Marriage California

Common Law Marriage California

 

A Quick Guide to Common Law Marriage in California

 

Does CA Recognize Common Law Marriage Laws?

 

In order to answer such a question about a common law marriage in California, it’s essential to know marriage requirements in the state.  The state recognizes domestic partnerships and legal marriage, and the requirements for such procedures are normally similar.  Marriage requirements include the following qualifications:

 

• Not within another marriage

• Two parties are together at the time of marriage, not by proxy

• a valid picture identification brought to the County Clerk’s Office

• provide a specific date any former marriages ended, and some marriage requirements in certain counties involve presenting a copy of the final judgment

• marry within 90 days of marriage license being issued

• have the marriage ceremony operated by the County Clerk or valid official according to county marriage requirements listed at the following website.

 

The marriage requirements listed above do not apply to a common law marriage in California because such unions do not exist in the California.

 

However, according to certain common law marriage laws and cases in the past, certain counties in California will recognize a common law marriage.  California does not require standard marriage requirements for such a union, and in fact, recognition of a common law marriage in CA is usually reached through a loophole.

 

Common Law Marriage “Laws” in California

 

Although there are no official common law marriage laws in CA, there are two ways a couple can have the state recognize the marriage: signing power of attorney papers while in the relationship, or contracting the common law matrimony in a state and district that recognized such a union.

 

In order validate the common law marriage in California, the court will consider several factors in certain cases like a divorce or separation proceeding.  The common law marriage laws, or factors, include, the following:

 

• the two parties actually cohabitated in an out of state jurisdiction

• the out of state jurisdiction had established common law marriage requirements

• the date of actually declaring the specific type of marriage can be established by the court

• if no common law marriage laws exist within the other jurisdiction, the court must determine if taking a Marvin Action is appropriate in a “divorce” or separation proceeding

 

If two couples want the state of California to recognize their common law marriage in an out of state jurisdiction, the two couples are usually advised to form an agreement or Marvin Action before officially declaring the common law marriage.  Two couples will normally establish a durable power of attorney and medical power of attorney with help of a qualified legal professional.

 

If two couples within a common law marriage come to an agreement about the division of property in a future separation in an out of state jurisdiction, the state of California will normally recognize such agreements now because of Marvin v. Marvin as well.  Common law marriage requirements state that no agreement can be meretricious, or in other words, based upon the promise of sexual relations.

Copy of Marriage License California

Copy of Marriage License California

 

How to Obtain Copies of Marriage Licenses in California 

 

Receiving a Copy of Marriage License in California

 

There are a number of steps you’ll have to take in order to receive copies of marriage licenses in California, but these steps are quite easy if followed in order.  These steps are listed in the following sections, and you can also find information for finding your local county recorder in this article as well.  

 

Step 1 Retrieve and fill out Application for Certified Copy of Marriage Record

 

You will have to bring a specific form to the county recorder while receiving the copy of marriage license in California.  There are multiple sections in this form, and you must sign a sworn statement that is attached at the bottom of the form in order to receive copies of marriage licenses in California. 

 

You’ll have to fill out applicant information, marriage record information, and the sworn statement that clarifies you are of proper relation to the person listed in the copy of marriage license in California.  

 

This form can be found under the California Department of Public Health or at the following link

 

Step 2: Bring all necessary items and payments

 

In order to receive copies of marriage licenses in California, you’ll have to bring all necessary identification, related forms, and the required amount of fees.  Descriptions of these items are listed below: 

 

1. Identification- In order to receive a copy of marriage license in California, you’ll have to bring valid id, which is recognized as a driver’s license, birth certificate, U.S. passport, military ID car, or your Social Security number.  

 

2. Divorce Decree- If you have been recently divorced, you must bring a copy of the divorce decree in order to qualify for copies of marriage licenses in California.  The decree must state that enough time has passed in order for the divorce to be viewed as official. 

 

3. Pay the Fees- In order to submit the application for a copy of marriage license in California, you must submit a check or money order of $14 for every copy your wish to receive.  Even after the marriage becomes official, you will not receive a copy of marriage license from the state, and you will have to return the original with authorization and signature from the person who performed the marriage within 10 days.  

 

How do I contact my County Recorder? 

 

In order to contact your county recorder for copies of marriage licenses in California, you can use several different resources to bring you to the same contact information.  The easiest method you can use is following the link provided below under the California Department of Public Health. 

 

The county recorders listed throughout the entire state of California provide copies for not only marriage licenses but birth and death records as well.  Make sure you have all the required forms and information with your before you travel to the county recorder.  They will not accept an application without required information and/or fees.  

New York Strikes down Defense of Marriage Act

New York Strikes down Defense of Marriage Act


On October 18, 2012, the New York Federal Appeals Court for the Second Circuit ruled that the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) is unconstitutional.  A decision in a lower court ruled 2-1 that the Act is unconstitutional, and the decision was upheld by the Federal Appeals Court on Thursday.  


In Windsor v. United States, the court ruled in favor of Edith Windsor, who is 83 years of age and a lesbian.  She was with her partner, Thea Clara Spyer, for 42 years and decided to sue the federal government after she was denied spousal deductions following Spyer’s death.  


Windsor owed $363,053 for inheritance taxes following Spyer’s death, and she decided to take action.


Although the state only recognized a marriage between partners of the opposite sex at the time of Spyer’s death, a New York Court ruled in 2009 that foreign same-sex marriages are valid in the state.  Windsor and Spyer married in 2007 in Toronto after that were together for 40 years, thus the state of New York was forced to recognize their marriage as valid.  


On Thursday, the New York Court declared that the Defense of Marriage Act violated the equal protection clause in the Constitution, and Windsor does not have to pay inheritance tax.  


During arguments, the court reasoned that even if the Act holds preservation of tradition, DOMA is not an appropriate way to manage the tradition.  The court quoted the earlier findings in the district court: “because the decision of whether same-sex couples can marry is left to the states, DOMA does not, strictly speaking, ‘preserve’ the institution of marriage as one between a man and a woman.”


The decision in New York adds to the latest initiatives by states to give rights to same-sex couples.  So far, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Iowa, Vermont, New Hampshire, New York and the District of Columbia give marriage licenses to same-sex couples.  Five other states give similar rights in both same-sex unions and marriages: Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, New Jersey, and Rhode Island.  


Windsor v. United States will ultimately be decided by the United States Supreme Court.  


Source: 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals

Gay Marriage Rights

Gay Marriage Rights

Gay Marriage
Explained:


Gay marriage (also referred to as same sex marriage) refers
to a marriage between two persons of the same gender or biological sex. Gay
marriage, in regards to its legality, is widely debated. Since the turn of the
century, ten countries have legalized gay marriage in some aspect: Argentina,
Iceland, Canada, Belgium, the Netherlands, Portugal, Norway, Spain, Sweden and
South Africa. Gay marriage is also practiced in some parts of the United States
and Mexico City.

The introduction of gay marriage will greatly vary by
jurisdiction, as a result of legislative changes to marriage laws and/or court
contests based on constitutional guarantees of equality. In some jurisdictions,
the legality of gay marriage was instituted to replace the previously accepted
formations, such as civil unions or registered partnerships.

The delivery of gay marriage rights is a civil, political,
religious, social and moral issue in the majority of nations. Conflicts arise
regarding whether gay marriage couples should be allowed to marry, be required
to agree to a different formation (i.e. a civil union, which grants limited
rights when compared to a marriage) or not be allowed any rights.

The crux of the same-sex marriage argument revolves around
the religious and nuclear interpretation of what a family is. The common
dictionary definition of a family is “the foundational unit in society having
two adults living together and cooperating for the care of their children.”
This definition, which is all-inclusive and extensive in terms of its
androgynous text, is not uniform with regards to the legal definition of
marriage. Many religious and conservative social thinkers believe that gay
marriage rights should not be included nor alter the definition of a legal
marriage.

Gay marriage rights are not recognized by the United States
Federal Government; however, gay couples may legally marry in the following
states: Connecticut, Massachusetts, Iowa, New Hampshire, Vermont and New York, also
including the District of Columbia. Same-sex couples in these states may
legally marry and receive all state-level benefits that are traditionally
awarded to opposite-sex married couples.

 

Gay Marriage Rights
in the United States:


Gay Marriage in
Massachusetts:
In 2003, the Massachusetts Supreme Court ruled that the
state law banning gay marriage was unconstitutional under the state’s
constitution. As a result, the court ordered the legislature to remedy the
discriminatory act (banning of same-sex marriage) within six months. A year
later, the court ruled that offering civil partnerships and unions instead of
marriages was not sufficient according to the landmark case Goodridge v. Department of Public Health.
Because of this interpretation, gay couples in the state were legally allowed
to enter into civil marriages.

Gay Marriage in
Connecticut:
In October of 2008, The Connecticut Supreme Court similarly
ruled that the state’s laws regarding civil unions discriminated on the grounds
of sexual orientation and was thus unconstitutional. The court stated that “the
segregation of heterosexual and homosexual couples into distinct institutions
constitutes harm.” The Connecticut Supreme Court ruled that gay couples must be
allowed to legally marry and the state of Connecticut, as a result, began
issuing marriage license the following month.

Gay Marriage in Iowa
and Vermont:
In the spring of 2009, Iowa and Vermont began offering gay
marriage rights. The Iowa Supreme Court ruled–in unanimous fashion—that the
state’s laws barring gay marriage was unconstitutional—the Supreme Court ruled
that gay couples must have legal access to forming a marriage.

Vermont became the first state to offer marriage equality
through legislative action when the legislature overruled a governor veto to
legalize gay marriage in the state. Gay marriage laws officially went into
effect on September 1st of 2009.

Gay Marriage Rights
in Maine:
In May of 2009, Maine’s legislature passed the gay marriage bill.
John Baldacci, the governor of Maine, had initially opposed offering gay
marriage rights, but immediately signed the bill after it passed in the Senate.
Baldacci believed that his vacillation regarding the legalization of gay
marriage was based on equal protection and the question of fairness under state
and federal law. Baldacci believed that civil unions were not equivalent to
civil marriages. Although gay marriage rights gained momentum, the bill stayed
pending as a ballot measure. Maine voters eventually repealed marriage equality
in November of 2009 and the state maintained its “marriage lite” status—gay
couples share several of the rights of married couples but do not share equal
rights with traditional opposite sex couples.

Gay Marriage Rights
in New Hampshire:
In June of 2009, the state’s legislature passed a gay
marriage bill. Governor John Lynch—who originally opposed same-sex marriage
because religious groups were not mandated to offer same-sex ceremonies or
provide similar services—signed the bill into law the same day it was passed by
the house. Gay marriage rights were put into effect on January 2010.

Gay Marriage Rights
in California:
In California, the state’s gay marriage ban was reversed in
August of 2010. On May 15th of 2008, the state’s Supreme Court ruled
that limiting marriage to only the opposite sex violates the state’s
Constitution and ordered the language afflicted from the statute. From June
until November of 2008, roughly 18,000 gay couples wed in the state of
California. However, the passage of Proposition 8 in November of the same year
limited marriage in the state to only opposite sex couples.

In response to proposition 8, an assortment of gay, lesbian,
bisexual and transgender groups challenged the passing. The California Supreme
Court agreed to review the case. The court held that Proposition 8 is valid;
this review held that gay couples are only able to register as domestic
partners and may not marry. The state’s Supreme Court, however, did uphold
existing gay marriage rights as valid.

In January of 2010, a federal trial took place in the state.
The case Perry v. Scwarzenegger challenged
Proposition 8 based on federal law. Following of two weeks of testimony, an
appeal to the Ninth Circuit federal court where it is currently pending.

 

Gay Marriage Rights
in Washington, D.C. New York and Maryland:


·        
In March of 2010, gay marriage became legal in
Washington D.C.; gay marriage rights were awarded after the city council’s vote
passed through the Congressional approval period.

·        
Maryland and a number of other states,
explicitly recognize gay marriage when it is entered into states that allow
them.


·        
New York passed the gay marriage bill during the
summer of 2011.

 

Gay Marriage Rights
in Other States:


Washington, Oregon, Nevada, New Jersey and California offer
either domestic partnerships or civil unions that are regarded as the legal
equivalent to marriage in the states that offer gay marriage.

The gay marriage rights awarded under a domestic partnership
or civil union include:

·        
The right to sue for loss of consortium,
wrongful death and based on any tort or law regarding a spousal relationship

·        
The right under family laws, including divorce,
annulment, child support, child custody, domestic violence, alimony, property
division and adoption

·        
Gay marriage rights under a civil union or
domestic partnership include the delivery of medical rights, such as
notification, hospital visitation and durable power of attorney.

·        
Gay marriage rights under a civil union or
domestic partnership include the ability to file a joint tax petition and the
right to secure family leave benefits

·        
Gay marriage rights under a civil union or
domestic partnership include the ability to receive property inheritances when
a partner dies without a will.

 

Legislation
Associated with Gay Marriage Rights:


The Defense of
Marriage Act:


The Defense of Marriage Act, which was enacted by Congress
in 1996, bars federal recognition of gay marriage and allows states to
implement the same relief. Since 1996, a number of states have enacted
legislation prohibiting gay marriage or the recognition of gay marriage formed
in other jurisdictions. In the U.S., states have conventionally recognized
marriages that are honored in other jurisdictions, even if the solemnizing
state vehemently outlaws same sex marriage.

Based on the full faith and credit clause of the United
States Constitution, individual states are typically required to honor and
recognize the public laws of other states, unless the attached laws are held
separate to the strong public policy of that particular state.

Over half of the states in the U.S. have passed language to
further define marriage between a male and female in their respective
constitutions.

Currently, thirty-seven states currently observe statutory
Defense of Marriage Acts. Three of these states possess statutory language that
pre-date the Defense of Marriage Act which further defines marriage as between
a male and a female. Moreover, thirty states have formally defined marriage in
their constitutions.

 

The following states with statutes that define a marriage
between a male and a female:

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut,
Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas,
Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi,
Missouri, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania,
South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington,
West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

The following states possess constitutional language to
define marriage:

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado,
Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan,
Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma,
Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia and
Wisconsin.

The following states do not possess laws prohibiting gay
marriage:

Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Iowa, Massachusetts,
New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island and Vermont.

The following states have passed a Defense of Marriage Act
Constitutional Amendment in 2008:

Arizona, California and Florida

 

The Marriage
Recognition and Family Protection Act:


In October of 2009, following the passage of Prop 8 in the
state of California, Governor Schwarzenegger signed the Marriage Recognition
and Family Protection Act into law. The law established that same of the gay
sex marriages performed outside of the state may be recognized within
California as a legal “marriage” depending on the date of the wedding.

 

 

Marriage Certificate North Carolina

Marriage Certificate North Carolina

 

 

How to Obtain Marriage Certificates in NC

 

 

Marriage Certificates (North Carolina)

 

 

If you want to obtain a marriage certificate (North Carolina), you’ll have to follow specific steps before the state finalizes the marriage.  This article will cover the majority of the steps, and for more questions, you should contact your county clerk.  You can find contact information for all counties at the following link

 

 

Step 1: Meet Eligibility Requirements in NC

 

 

Before receiving marriage certificates (North Carolina), two spouses of opposite sex must have a clerk approve the marriage in the first place. If two people meet any of the factors below, a clerk will not approve the marriage certificate (North Carolina) 

 

 

1. the marriage was between two people closer in relation that first cousins or double first cousins 

 

 

2. either spouse was under the age of 16 during the marriage (except in limited circumstances)

 

 

3. either spouse had another husband or wife during the second marriage

 

 

4. either spouse was physically impotent 

 

 

5. either spouse was mentally incompetent during the marriage

 

 

Step 2: Bring all necessary items to the local court

 

 

In order for a clerk to approve marriage certificates (North Carolina), two future spouses must submit all proper documentation and fees.  The following items will help the two people receive a marriage certificate in North Carolina: 

 

 

Identification: NC law requires you to bring your driver’s license, birth certificate, U.S. passport, military ID car, or your Social Security number.  You won’t have to bring all these items, but you will need at least one so the clerk can verify your identity and approve the marriage certificate (North Carolina).

 

 

Divorce Decree: If you were in another marriage and went through a divorce, you’ll need to bring a copy of the divorce decree with you to the county clerk.  The same rules apply for obtaining marriage certificates (North Carolina) if you are a widow.  

 

 

Necessary Fees: The first marriage certificate (North Carolina) will usually cost $26 and any additional copies will cost $15, but fees may range from county to county.  If you need copies of marriage certificates (North Carolina), you can submit an application to Vital Records.  You may even be able to waive the fee if you received premarital counseling from a qualified professional.  

 

 

Step 3: Legally Solemnize the Marriage

 

 

Marriage certificates in North Carolina can only be signed by the officiator if they qualify according to Chapter 51-1 of the NC Statutes: 

 

 

• In the presence of an ordained minister of any religious denomination or a magistrate

 

 

• With the consequent declaration by the minister or magistrate that the parties are husband and wife

 

 

• Federally or State recognized Indian Nation or Tribe

 

 

If the marriage was solemnized by any qualified persons above, the officiator will sign the marriage certificate (North Carolina), and the spouses will have to return the document to the county for verification.  

 

 

Annulment of marriage in Maine

Annulment of marriage in Maine

 

What is an Annulment of Marriage?

 

 

An annulment of marriage is a formal means of terminating a union. Annulments are different from separations or divorces; annulments nullify the marriage to treat the formation as though it never existed. An annulment views the marriage as non-existent; the presiding court will declare the marriage to have never taken place in the first place. Annulments are typically desired for religious couples who view divorce as sin or for those couples who got married in haste.   

 

 

To secure an annulment of marriage, the individual seeking the action must maintain sufficient grounds for an annulment. Grounds for annulments of marriage vary by state, but typically involve one spouse’s lack of capacity for marriage or some sort of fraud at the time of the marriage. 

 

 

Can I Get an Annulment of Marriage in ME?

 

 

As in many other states, married parties in Maine can assume an annulment through the filing of a Complaint for Annulment at their local probate and family court. As stated above, an annulment of marriage in Maine is a legal decree to nullify the validity of a marriage. Annulments of marriage in Maine must be legally petitioned for, and as a general rule, are difficult to prove and have adjudicated. To file for annulments of marriage in Maine, a spouse must claim one of the following grounds:

 

 

Annulment of Marriage in ME : Fraud: To secure an annulment of marriage in Maine, a spouse may claim fraud. Annulments of marriage in Maine will be granted under this ground if it can be proven that one of the spouses misrepresented him or herself to obtain consent for marriage.

 

 

Annulment of Marriage in ME : Mental Incapacitation: According to annulments of marriage in Maine law, a spouse may be entitled to an annulment if the other spouse is deemed mentally incapacitated by the court.

 

 

Annulment of Marriage in ME : Underage Marriages: A spouse may secure an annulment of marriage in Maine if it is proven, that at the time of the marriage, one of the spouses was below the age of majority.

 

 

Annulment of Marriage in ME : Impotency: A spouse may secure an annulment of marriage in Maine if it is proven, that at the time of the marriage, one of the spouses was impotent

 

 

Annulment of Marriage in ME : Consanguinity: Spouses may secure annulments of marriage if they engage in a wedding to a close relative. Maine annulment laws deem a marital relationship as any that is made between full-blooded or half-blooded relatives. I.e. marriages with natural parents, children, grandchildren, grandparents, uncles, aunts, nieces, stepparents, stepchildren, adoptive parents, brothers, half brothers, sisters, half-sisters and/or nephews. 

 

 

Annulments of marriage in Maine are governed by Maine General Laws Chapter 207, Section 14; this statute allows either party to file an action for an annulment of marriage in Maine. Moreover, this statute also allows one of the parties to institute an action for affirming the marriage.

 

 

It must be stated: courts in Maine rarely grant annulments of marriage in Maine, unless the petitioner (individual filing for an annulment of marriage in Maine) can clearly demonstrate that the marriage is fraudulent or invalid. An annulment of marriage in Maine is not the same as a divorce. With a divorce filing, one or both spouses petition the probate and family court to terminate their valid marriage. Whereas with an annulment of marriage in Maine, one or both of the parties must seek to prove that their marriage was never valid or that the marriage should be voided because it is not legally recognizable. A voidable marriage is deemed binding and legal if the parties opt to remain married. 

 

 

In either of the aforementioned instances, if the petition for an annulment of marriage in ME is successful, the party will literally undo their marriage by treating their union as non-existent. With a void marriage, the parties do not need to petition the state court, because—by definition of marriage law—they were never legally married. 

 

 

 

Marriage Certificate Mississippi

Marriage Certificate Mississippi

 

 

Marriage Certificates in Mississippi 

 

 

Marriage Certificates in Mississippi

 

 

In order to validate a marriage certificate in Mississippi, two prospective spouses must follow a number of steps and make sure the marriage is valid under law.  This article will discuss steps two people should take to finalize their marriage certificate in Mississippi after obtaining a marriage license, but qualifying factors to legally marry need explained beforehand.  

 

 

Marriage Requirements in Mississippi

 

 

In order to receive marriage certificates in Mississippi, two future spouses cannot meet any of the categories listed below: 

 

 

1. incurable impotency 

 

 

2. adjudicated mental illness or incompetence of either or both parties (a guardian or friend may file suit within six months after marriage in such a case) 

 

 

3. when either party is incapable of consenting to any marriage because of incapacity or age

 

 

4. the marriage was formed with force or fraud

 

 

5. pregnancy of the wife by another person if the husband did not know of the pregnancy

 

 

6. a son cannot marry his grandmother, mother, stepmother, his legally adopted daughter, or his granddaughter, as well as a first cousin by blood

 

 

7. a father cannot marry his son’s widow, his wife’s daughter, his granddaughter, his daughter-in-law, or his niece (all of these conditions apply for females in the same degrees)

 

 

8. between the same gender

 

 

9. either party is under the age of 17 unless approved by each of the parties’ parents or legal guardians

 

 

Step 2 Solemnization Requirements for Marriage Certificates in Mississippi

 

 

If couples have qualified for a marriage certificate in Mississippi, they will receive a copy of the marriage license along with a blank return for the person who has solemnized the marriage.  In order for a couple to legally receive a marriage certificate in Mississippi , the marriage must be solemnized according to Code 93-1-17 By whom marriages may be solemnized.  

 

 

The code provides that only the following qualified individuals can solemnize a marriage and validate a marriage certificate in Mississippi: 

 

 

• any minister of the gospel ordained according to the rules of the church or society

 

 

• any Rabbi or other spiritual leader or any other religious body

 

 

• judge of the Supreme Court, Court of Appeals, circuit court, chancery court or county court

 

 

• a mayor prior to March 14, 1994 unless invalidated by a local jurisdiction 

 

 

Step 3 Return Signed Marriage Certificates in Mississippi to the Circuit Clerk

 

 

Marriage certificates in Mississippi must be signed by the person who legally solemnized the marriage and returned to the circuit clerk as soon as possible.  After the clerk has received the validated and complete marriage certificate in Mississippi, they and the circuit court will be the full custodian of records relating to the marriage.  

 

 

According to section 93-1-23, the clerk of the circuit court in each county “shall be the legal custodian of the records and papers relating to marriage licenses and certificates of marriage formerly kept by the clerk of the probate court.”  Marriage certificates in Mississippi and marriage license copies can be obtained from the circuit clerk.  

 

 

Foreign-Born Asians Most Likely to Marry

Foreign-Born Asians Most Likely to Marry


On October 16, 2012, the Census Bureau announced that foreign-born Asian Americans are the most likely to marry than any other foreign-born or native-born, self-identified group in the United States.  Foreign-born Asian Americans are the most likely to live in multigenerational households as well.  

The findings were released in the 2011 American Community Survey that was just recently released by the Census Bureau.  

According to the Survey, about 65.8 percent of foreign-born Asian Americans are married.  About 58.3 percent of all other foreign-born Americans are married, and 46.5 percent native-born Americans are married.  Additionally, about 9.4 percent of foreign-born Asian Americans live in a multigenerational home (with three or more generations), while only 4.9 percent of native-born Americans live in a multigenerational household.  U.S. citizens born in the Philippines or Vietnam have the most multigenerational households.  

According to the Census Bureau, about 13 percent of all 311.6 million Americans were born outside of the United States.  Foreign-born Asian Americans accounted for one-fourth of U.S. citizens born out of the country.  About 11.6 million Asian Americans were born outside of the United States.  

The following statistics were also released by the 2011 American Community Survey:

•    about 2.2 million foreign-born citizens are from China; about 1.9 million are from India; about 1.8 million are from the Philippines; about 1.3 million are from Vietnam; and about 1.1 million are from Korea
•    about 83 percent the Asian-born population who are 25 years of age or older have a high school diploma, and about 48 percent have a bachelor’s degree or higher
•    foreign-born Asians are the most likely to become naturalized citizens (about 58 percent)
•    the states with more than half of the foreign-born population from Asia include California (about 3.7 million), New York (about 1.2 million), Texas (about 778,000), and New Jersey (about 593,000)

Source: https://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/american_community_survey_acs/cb12-198.html
Foreign-Born Asians Most Likely to Marry
On October 16, 2012, the Census Bureau announced that foreign-born Asian Americans are the most likely to marry than any other foreign-born or native-born, self-identified group in the United States.  Foreign-born Asian Americans are the most likely to live in multigenerational households as well.  

The findings were released in the 2011 American Community Survey that was just recently released by the Census Bureau.  

According to the Survey, about 65.8 percent of foreign-born Asian Americans are married.  About 58.3 percent of all other foreign-born Americans are married, and 46.5 percent native-born Americans are married.  Additionally, about 9.4 percent of foreign-born Asian Americans live in a multigenerational home (with three or more generations), while only 4.9 percent of native-born Americans live in a multigenerational household.  U.S. citizens born in the Philippines or Vietnam have the most multigenerational households.  

According to the Census Bureau, about 13 percent of all 311.6 million Americans were born outside of the United States.  Foreign-born Asian Americans accounted for one-fourth of U.S. citizens born out of the country.  About 11.6 million Asian Americans were born outside of the United States.  

The following statistics were also released by the 2011 American Community Survey:

-about 2.2 million foreign-born citizens are from China; about 1.9 million are from India; about 1.8 million are from the Philippines; about 1.3 million are from Vietnam; and about 1.1 million are from Korea

-about 83 percent the Asia-born population who are 25 years of age or older have a high school diploma, and about 48 percent have a bachelor’s degree or higher

-foreign-born Asians are the most likely to become naturalized citizens (about 58 percent)

-the states with more than half of the foreign-born population from Asia include California (about 3.7 million), New York (about 1.2 million), Texas (about 778,000), and New Jersey (about 593,000)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau
 

Copy of Marriage License Mississippi

Copy of Marriage License Mississippi

 

 

Obtaining Copies of Marriage Licenses: Mississippi

 

 

Copies of Marriage Licenses: Mississippi

 

 

The annotated Mississippi code has specific instruction for obtaining a copy of marriage license.  Mississippi licenses are discussed in Chapter 1 of Title 93 of the annotated code, and sections 93-1-5 and 93-1-11 are discussed within this article.  Additionally, some helpful information about necessary items you’ll have to bring to obtain a copy of marriage license in Mississippi is also provided in this article. 

 

 

Section 93-1-5: Precedent Conditions before Copies of Marriage Licenses: Mississippi

 

 

This section of annotated code lays out conditions and procedures for the issuance of any copy of marriage license in Mississippi.  The parts of this section are discussed below:

 

 

(a) Parties hoping for copies of marriage licenses in Mississippi must file with the clerk of the circuit court unless the female applicant is under the age of 21 years of age and is a resident of MS—in which case the application must be submitted to the clerk of the female’s circuit court.  Additionally, the application for a copy of marriage license in Mississippi must contain names, ages, addresses of both parties, name of parents or next of kin, signatures of witnesses, and any other necessary information.  

 

 

(b) The application must remain open to the public for at least 3 days unless satisfactory proof can be provided to a judge to allow the marriage.  If either party is under the age of 21, they cannot receive a copy of marriage license (Mississippi) unless notice has been sent to the parent(s) or next of kin.  

 

 

(c) An affidavit showing the age of the applicants by the parent(s) or next of kin needs submitted with the application.  The circuit court will examine the document for copies of marriage licenses in Mississippi can be issued.  

 

 

(d) The clerk will not issue a copy of marriage license in Mississippi if the male applicant is under the age of 17 and the female is under the age of 15.  If both the parties are minors, the court must still hear testimony from both parties’ parents in support of the union

 

 

(e) A medical certificate dated 30 days before the application is submitted must be provided to the clerk to determine both spouses are free from syphilis, and the certificate will be examined by the court before copies of marriage licenses in Mississippi are issued.  

 

 

(f) No copy of marriage license in Mississippi will be issued if either party is drunk or has a mental illness or disability which does not let them understand the consequences of the request.  

 

 

Section 93-1-11 Hours of Issuance for Copy of Marriage License: Mississippi 

 

 

This section of code states that a clerk cannot issue copies of marriage licenses between the hours of 6 p.m. and 8 a.m.  

 

 

When applying for a copy of marriage license in Mississippi, make sure you bring proper identification and enough money for the filing of the application.  Fees will range in MS, so you may want to contact the local circuit court before submitting the application.  To contact clerks around the state, visit the link